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BeitragVerfasst: Mo 12. Mai 2014, 16:59 
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Die "Dreiteilige Formel" der Edaphon-Analyse nach den Francé

Bild
groß

Aus: Annie Francé-Harrar; Humus. Bodenleben und Fruchtbarkeit (Buch. S. 127)

Die Analyse erfolgt

(1) Physikalisch
(2) Chemisch
(3) Biologisch

Ein Idealboden sollte folgende Zusammensetzung aufweisen (Buch S.20*):

65% Organische Substanz
20% Edaphische Organismen
15% Mineralsubstanz

Die Methoden und Ergebnisse sollen hier diskutiert und mit den herkömmlichen Verfahren der Bodenanalyse verglichen werden.

---
*) siehe auch

An meinen unbekannten Nachfolger

Erwünscht ist, dass sich nur wenig Mineralisches, dafür sehr viel Humoses im Impfstoff befindet.

Ein ideales Verhältnis ist:

Mineralische Substanz 15 %
Humose Substanz 65 %
Organismenmasse 20 %

http://stiftung-france.de/forum/viewtop ... f=95&t=369


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BeitragVerfasst: Mo 12. Mai 2014, 17:05 
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Ohne Labor und Spaten - nur mit dem nackten Auge allein

Visual Soil Assessment (VSA)

Bild

A quick, simple and effective method to assess soil quality and plant performance
http://www.bioagrinomics.com/visual-soil-assessment.html

Graham Shepherd
http://www.bioagrinomics.com/resume.html

Visual Soil Assessment
http://www.dairynz.co.nz/file/fileid/39038

Visual Soil Assessment (VSA)
http://www.carbonfarming.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/VSASummaryStatement.pdf

LAB-LESS SOIL CHECK
http://rockinsoils.com/2013/09/16/lab-less-soil-check/

VISUAL SOIL ASSESSMENT
VSA Manual Tanzania.pdf

Assessing the productivity function of soils
http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/88/65/48/PDF/hal-00886548.pdf

ASSESSING SOIL’S MICROSCOPIC WORK FORCE - WITHOUT A MICROSCOPE !

Bild

http://rockinsoils.com/2013/10/31/assessing-life-in-soil/


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BeitragVerfasst: Di 13. Mai 2014, 07:16 
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Ergänzend dazu:
http://www.immenfreunde.de/humus/Visual_Soil_Assessment.pdf

Sowie aus den Anfängen meiner Bodenerkundungen:
http://www.immenfreunde.de/humus/bodenanalyse.pdf

Sowie im "Humus ist Leben"-Dokument ab Seite 62:
http://www.immenfreunde.de/humus/HumusLeben.pdf


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BeitragVerfasst: Di 3. Jun 2014, 21:32 
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So ungefähr macht Ingham eine Boden-Analyse (sowie inklusive Licht-mikroskopischer Untersuchung):

EARTHFORT
http://earthfort.com/
635 SW Western Blvd
Corvallis, OR 97333

"Test Descriptions - Testing Overview:
We utilize a variety of testing methodologies to measure the abundance of life in Soils and Soil
Amendments. Except where noted these tests do not identify specific organisms. Rather we measure
the Biomass of Total Populations in general categories of the functional groups. The totals of these
groups represent a snapshot of the biological profile at the time of testing. While each of these tests
can be performed singularly, we have found that together they represent a comprehensive picture of
the health and utility of the material tested."

Mehr hier:

http://earthfort.com/assets/images/lab/assay_descriptions.pdf

Das wird noch ausführlich zu diskutieren sein ..


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BeitragVerfasst: Mo 16. Jun 2014, 17:02 
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Hier eine Bodenanalyse nach Ingham:

OUR BACKYARD SOIL SAMPLE – THE RESULTS ARE IN!

http://vergepermaculture.ca/blog/2012/05/08/soil-results-are-in/

Warum nach Ingham ? Na, weil sie die Mikroorganismen in ihre Bodenanalyse mit einbezieht.


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BeitragVerfasst: Mo 16. Jun 2014, 21:56 
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Example of a Comprehensive Compost Analysis

http://www.midwestbiosystems.com/PDF/lab-test-forms/sample-analysis-form.pdf

Diesmal eine Kompost-Analyse.

Auch nicht schlecht. Brauchen wir auch. Schön viel zum Denken und vergleichen mit den Francé.

http://www.midwestbiosystems.com

Erstaunlich. Obwohl sie "nur" Kompostwendemaschinen herstellen, machen sie "trotzdem" so umfangreiche, auch mikrobielle, Kompostanalysen.

Es gibt auch einen "Kompost-Blog" zu ihrer Kompostherstellung.

Lübke, Hildebrandt & Großfamilie, die auch Kompostwendemaschinen herstellen, machen "nur" "Chroma"-Test.
Buch habbich. Von Hildebrandt geschenkt. Nicht mehr lieferbar. Muß mal digitalisiert werden.


Oh, oh, "MidwestBioSystems" machen "humified compost":

The Microbial Inoculation Process

Composting is a microbially driven process that:

* First, breaks down organic matter, then
* Builds that material into humus.

http://midwestbiosystems.com/education-corner/the-microbial-inoculation-process

Immerhin ..

Mit "geheimnisvollen "inoculants:

http://midwestbiosystems.com/inoculants

Da gibt es wieder eine "Pfeiffer-Lübke-Petrik-Connection".

Auch diese geheimnivollen Inoculants werden wir eines Tages unter dem Mikroskop freilegen.

Insgesamt erzählen sie aber schon viel von ihrem Produktionsprozeß.


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BeitragVerfasst: Di 15. Jul 2014, 12:07 
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The need for Total Testing.txt


Soil: The need for Total Testing

Author: Hugh Lovel

reprinted from Acres USA

"What many farmers probably don’t know is that most soil tests only tell us what is soluble in the soil. They do not tell us what is actually there in the soil, no matter what fertiliser salesmen might like to imply. To find out what is actually there requires a total acid digest similar to what is used for plant tissue analysis. Mining labs run these total acid digests on ore samples which are crushed, ground and extracted with concentrated nitric and hydrochloric acid solutions, but a mining assay does not determine total carbon, nitrogen and sulphur as a plant tissue analysis would. These elements need a separate procedure which is essential for evaluating soil humic reserves.
Most soil tests do measure total carbon, which then is multiplied by 1.72 to calculate soil organic matter. This assumes that most of the carbon in the soil is humus of one form or another. While this may or may not be true, determining the carbon to nitrogen, nitrogen to sulphur and nitrogen to phosphorus ratios is a good guide to evaluating organic matter, and this requires testing total nitrogen, sulphur and phosphorous as well as carbon.
While carbon in almost any form is a benefit to the soil, it helps enormously if it is accompanied by the right ratios of nitrogen, sulphur and phosphorous. Though these ratios are not set in stone, a target for carbon to nitrogen is 10 : 1, for nitrogen to sulphur is 5.5 : 1 and for nitrogen to phosphorous is 4 : 1. This works out to an ideal carbon to sulphur ratio of 55 to 1, and a carbon to phosphorous ratio of 40 to 1. Because soil biology is very adjustable, these targets are not exact, but achieving them in soil total tests is a good indication of humus reserves that will supply the required amounts of amino acids, sulphates and phosphates whenever the soil foodweb draws on them."

...

"An Eye Opener
As an agricultural consultant in far northern Queensland, Australia I grew 2 to 3 thousand dollars of culinary ginger in my garden as well as an aloe vera nursery—without nitrogen fertilisers. Both were high silicon crops. At nearby Mt. Garnet we had a diatomaceous earth mine that sold diatomaceous earth (DE) at $300/ton—somewhat pricy, but an excellent silicon fertiliser. When I sprinkled this DE on my ginger it grew beautifully, and was twice as robust wherever I spilled a liberal amount. The same was true for my aloe vera. What was clear was that nitrogen fixation and amino acid uptake by both ginger and aloe was far more abundant with high silicon availability. On a nearby banana farm using the same diatomaceous earth at a rate of 1 ton per hectare (2.5 acres) there was 1.28 more new leaves per month, a sure sign of quality nitrogen availability and robust growth. This meant silicon was a huge influence in nitrogen fixation.
One of the most common problems is too much soluble nitrogen at any given time. A little nitrogen on a steady basis is good, but it is easy to go overboard. Nitrogen availability is a double edged sword because too much soluble N leads to the nitrification of amino acids, which strips silicon and boron from the soil while shutting down nitrogen fixation. The result is insufficient transport in following crops. We have to be observant and intelligent in our management of soil nitrogen, as ignorance is hardly bliss.
Grasses usually are the best silicon accumulators, which makes maintaining them in our soil cover along with legumes a good idea. Bare soil is always a dead loss and a sure way to ensure silicon and boron leaching—which easily results from too much cultivation, and this welcomes weeds. Weeds love soluble nutrients, which is one of the reasons we don’t want soluble nutrients. What we want is insoluble but available nutrients, and we want to get all our nitrogen from the air where it is abundant.
My target on pastures is to keep soluble silicon levels above 80 ppm with totals above 1000 ppm—not so hard without nitrogen fertiliser abuse. For tomatoes I like 100 ppm soluble silicon which is more difficult; and for cherries—a really silicon sensitive crop—I aim for 120 ppm. This really takes good management, though it pays off handsomely. Hopefully American soil laboratories will take total testing on board as my Australian lab, Environmental Analysis Laboratories (EAL) has.
Though growers can send samples to EAL, I’d prefer a quicker, more responsive domestic approach. So far the Texas Plant and Soil Labs in Edinburg, Texas and Midwest Laboratories in Omaha, Nebraska have indicated interest. I’m not sure how they do with the Mehlich III analysis, my preference, but I’d like to think they can perform adequate totals testing including totals for C, N and S."

More:

http://www.quantumagriculture.com/artic ... al-testing

---

Soil and Health Yahoo groups

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/soilandhealth/conversations/topics/38922

Unedited quotes

Soil: The need for Total Testing | Quantum Agriculture
Norm Cooper
Message 1 of 14 , Nov 13, 2013
View Source
http://www.quantumagriculture.com/artic ... al-testing
Hello All,
I have listed this link to Hugh Lovel with his idea of total soil tests. I am conducting trials very soon and as well as using this idea in normal soil tests, I will be using total testing in my trials as well. It may be of interest to some people.I hope you can see the benefit that it holds.
Regards





Norm Cooper
Farming Focus
12 Anne Street
KOROIT VIC. 3282
(03) 5565-8333 Mobile: 0428 761 109 e-mail: norm@...


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
Reply
Martin Fox
Nov 13, 2013
View Source
Soil tests: If you had the same soil samples tested using Melich3, Morgan extract and the Total Soil test what would these comparative tests reveal?

Would the results be very different? Would the recommendations for growing nutrient dense foods be significantly different? Has another one done this? Just wondering...

Martin
Reply
Norm Cooper
Nov 13, 2013
View Source
Hello Martin,
A good soil test usually shows Reams and Albrecht methods, and the total test uses similar methods to tissue testing. While Reams and Albrecht methods are basically soluble tests with their soluble fertiliser recommendations, the total test relies on the soil biota to release the nutrients. There is a huge increase in available nutrients in this manner. I am not into gardening, I am concentrating on animal health and soil health in the broad acre concept, and am about to start trials, possibly embracing brix readings. I have not had the opportunity to have a before and after to get a comparison as yet. I believe another lab in the US is able to do this test.
Regards





Norm Cooper
Farming Focus
12 Anne Street
KOROIT VIC. 3282
(03) 5565-8333 Mobile: 0428 761 109 e-mail: norm@...



From: Martin Fox
Sent: Thursday, November 14, 2013 9:57 AM
To: soilandhealth@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [soilandhealth] Re: Soil: The need for Total Testing | Quantum Agriculture




Soil tests: If you had the same soil samples tested using Melich3, Morgan extract and the Total Soil test what would these comparative tests reveal?

Would the results be very different? Would the recommendations for growing nutrient dense foods be significantly different? Has another one done this? Just wondering...

Martin




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
Reply
thurx
Nov 13, 2013
View Source
Hi Norm,

Right from the beginning of reading Hugh Lovel, I have questions!

He says "While carbon in almost any form is a benefit to the soil, it helps enormously if it is accompanied by the right ratios of nitrogen, sulphur and phosphorous." and then he proceeds to state the ratios. My question here is, isn't biochar a very special form of carbon? Shouldn't it NOT be considered in the ratio's, as it doesn't react chemically? And if this is so, but a "total test" is only measuring "total carbon" then doesn't the presence of biochar totally throw the "ratio's" so far off that they have no value except to mislead? I am really into this, as I have biochar in certain of my garden beds, and wonder if it is influencing my "% organic matter" when I get my soil tested. It probably is. But should it be figured into my "ratio's"?

Then, Lovel addresses biochar in a later section, but instead of answering questions, what he says brings up more questions:

He states that "char is bioactive". What does this mean. He seems to behave as though he means it is chemically active, which just isn't true as I understand it.

Only in the case of biochar produced from animal wastes is there going to be anything like "nutrition" available from the biochar. Biochar produced from plant residue is inert, functioning mainly to raise CEC, water retention, and pH, while changing the environment for microbes and earthworms.

http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets ... basics.pdf

Unfortunately, I am dangerously close to uneducated still, when it comes to soil analysis, and so may be totally misjudging Lovel in my characteristically intuitive way, with way to few facts. However, my gut feel after reading his work on the need for total testing is that it sounds like a good recipe for analysis paralysis. His target ratio's seem to be overkill and more like a gimmick to sell services. Does anyone have experience with his services? I believe you have used his broadcasters, haven't you Norm?

Glenn


Show message history
Reply
EAReinheimer
Nov 13, 2013
View Source
Hello Martin,

Well, at some point one has to move from seeing to intuiting.
I have some experience now with the M3, and it does help me intuit more.
After looking at 1000 or so M3 tests, I pretty much know what looks good, and what looks like it needs improvement.

I get similar information from looking at my plants in a quiet moment.

We are all wondering with our plants how we can best serve them. Just being open to the wonder will help immensely.

Erica


On 11/13/2013 2:57 PM, Martin Fox wrote:
Show message history

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Steve Solomon
Nov 13, 2013
View Source
Martin,
I can't speak about how to compare M3 with Morgan extractions, but I can tell you that a total test is where the soil itself is totally dissolved in the strongest acid and then all elements present are assayed. What you then know is the soil's ultimate potential to ever release these plant nutrients. If the total says you have lots of K but your M3 shows short K, then there's something you can maybe to do accelerate breakdown of rock particles and the availability of K, probably biological or in the realm of soil management. But if the total shows little K, then it's a matter of importing it.

Steve


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Steve Solomon
Nov 13, 2013
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Norm,
The way I understand it, no matter what you do biologically or in any
other manner short of importation, the total analysis won't change because
of anything you do or don't do. What will change is the amount of nutrients
AVAILABLE.

Steve


Show message history
Reply
Norm Cooper
Nov 14, 2013
View Source
Hello Steve,
I have not done enough work yet to determine much further than what we know, but if indications of total soil tests are looked at closely, the amount of nutrients are often vastly greater that the soluble tests. And the must be looked at in a different light. What these results show are not soluble nutrients like Reams and Albrecht tests, and they do not leech like the soluble tests. Often what you have with soluble tests requires massive inputs to make up the balance we need. The possibility I am finding, is that the microbes make the unavailable nutrients available to the plant as the plant requires them. This will be monitored in my trials over the next twelve months.
Regards





Norm Cooper
Farming Focus
12 Anne Street
KOROIT VIC. 3282
(03) 5565-8333 Mobile: 0428 761 109 e-mail: norm@...



From: Steve Solomon
Sent: Thursday, November 14, 2013 5:25 PM
To: soilandhealth@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [soilandhealth] Re: Soil: The need for Total Testing | Quantum Agriculture



Norm,
The way I understand it, no matter what you do biologically or in any
other manner short of importation, the total analysis won't change because
of anything you do or don't do. What will change is the amount of nutrients
AVAILABLE.

Steve

Show message history
Reply
Norm Cooper
Mar 25
View Source

http://www.quantumagriculture.com/node/212

Hello Steve,
This is a link to Hugh's article. Heide might also get answers to some of her questions by reading this. My research includes the principles of this article.
Regards
Reply
Norm Cooper
Mar 27
View Source

http://www.quantumagriculture.com/node/212

Hello Hugh,
Perhaps some solid ideas on total soil testing could be used with Graham Lancaster's article. This article should complete the picture.
Regards





Norm Cooper
Farming Focus
12 Anne Street
KOROIT VIC. 3282
(03) 5565-8333 Mobile: 0428 761 109 e-mail: norm@...
Reply
Anders
Apr 1
View Source
Norm et al

I just posted a comment to Hugh Lovel's article at quantumagriculture.com, as follows:

Hugh, why do you emphasise the importance of total tests in the context of humus and N, P, S and C? Are N, P and S (when part of humus) that inavailable chemically, but not biologically? I wasn't able to understand that from this article, but perhaps I missed something. I don't have time to check it up now, but I think at least N and S can be part of humus molecules (covalently bound), but also that N, P and S as part of negative ions (nitrate, phosphate, sulphate) can be ionically/electrostatically bound to positive parts of humus molecules (wherever these are ...). Could you expand a little on that? Like an article or two. ;-)

Cheers Anders


At 01:56 2014-03-26, Norm Cooper wrote:
Show message history
Reply
Anders
Apr 1
View Source
PS:
My input to quantumagriculture awaits moderating. But anyway, my reason for posting this here was of course to ask this list for comments.

Anders

At 18:41 2014-04-01, Anders wrote:
Show message history
Reply
trenthills_mike
Jul 14 10:52 PM
View Source
Hi Norm,

Interesting article, especially the line: "Only a small portion of these materials show up on soluble soil tests, even though they are available to the mycorrhizae, actinomycetes and/or protozoa."

I was trying to understand what he was saying and went looking for https://encrypted.google.com/search?q=t ... +soil+test. The first hit yields "Agronomic soil tests generally have been developed to try and extract the plant available fraction of a nutrient, or at least, a fraction that is strongly correlated to the plant available fraction. There has been less interest in the total levels of nutrients in the soil from an agronomic viewpoint, as they are often poorly correlated with plant availability". Then I went looking for https://encrypted.google.com/search?q=u ... mycorrhiza

It's the soil biology, the mycorrhizal fungi, that make unavailable nutrients in the soil available to the plant - http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF00000098. Page 143 of this article - http://eprints.nwisrl.ars.usda.gov/818/1/1076.pdf, says the same thing.

If mycorrhizal fungi can access the nutrients in the rocks, pebbles, gravels, sands, and silts and make them available to the plant, this may be what Ingham is getting at when she claims that soils are not deficient in minerals and that you just need to get the soil biology in place.

Regards,
Mike



---In soilandhealth@yahoogroups.com, <norm@...> wrote :

http://www.quantumagriculture.com/artic ... al-testing http://www.quantumagriculture.com/artic ... al-testing
Hello All,
I have listed this link to Hugh Lovel with his idea of total soil tests. I am conducting trials very soon and as well as using this idea in normal soil tests, I will be using total testing in my trials as well. It may be of interest to some people.I hope you can see the benefit that it holds.
Regards





Norm Cooper
Farming Focus
12 Anne Street
KOROIT VIC. 3282
(03) 5565-8333 Mobile: 0428 761 109 e-mail: norm@... mailto:norm@...


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
Reply
Norm Cooper
Message 14 of 14 , Today at 2:32 AM
View Source
Hello Michael,
Thanks for your interest. I am currently undertaking trials using EM type microbes as against Elaine Ingham compost teas. My method is a lot simpler, cheaper and at this stage, appears to be at least equal but I would say better than the compost tea approach. I most definitely am using total soil tests, and it appears that microbes are controlling the nutrient supply to the plants. It is very evident that with my trials, animal health is tops, I see little of these types of results with Ingham’s trials. After all, what is the main purpose of growing grass if not for animal feed.
Regards






Norm Cooper
Farming Focus
12 Anne Street
KOROIT VIC. 3282
(03) 5565-8333 Mobile: 0428 761 109 e-mail: norm@...

From: mailto:soilandhealth@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, July 15, 2014 3:52 PM
To: soilandhealth@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [soilandhealth] Re: Soil: The need for Total Testing | Quantum Agriculture

Hi Norm,

Interesting article, especially the line: "Only a small portion of these materials show up on soluble soil tests, even though they are available to the mycorrhizae, actinomycetes and/or protozoa."

I was trying to understand what he was saying and went looking for https://encrypted.google.com/search?q=t ... +soil+test. The first hit yields "Agronomic soil tests generally have been developed to try and extract the plant available fraction of a nutrient, or at least, a fraction that is strongly correlated to the plant available fraction. There has been less interest in the total levels of nutrients in the soil from an agronomic viewpoint, as they are often poorly correlated with plant availability". Then I went looking for https://encrypted.google.com/search?q=u ... mycorrhiza

It's the soil biology, the mycorrhizal fungi, that make unavailable nutrients in the soil available to the plant - http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF00000098. Page 143 of this article - http://eprints.nwisrl.ars.usda.gov/818/1/1076.pdf, says the same thing.

If mycorrhizal fungi can access the nutrients in the rocks, pebbles, gravels, sands, and silts and make them available to the plant, this may be what Ingham is getting at when she claims that soils are not deficient in minerals and that you just need to get the soil biology in place.

Regards,
Mike

---In soilandhealth@yahoogroups.com, <norm@...> wrote :

http://www.quantumagriculture.com/artic ... al-testing http://www.quantumagriculture.com/artic ... al-testing
Hello All,
I have listed this link to Hugh Lovel with his idea of total soil tests. I am conducting trials very soon and as well as using this idea in normal soil tests, I will be using total testing in my trials as well. It may be of interest to some people.I hope you can see the benefit that it holds.
Regards





Norm Cooper
Farming Focus
12 Anne Street
KOROIT VIC. 3282
(03) 5565-8333 Mobile: 0428 761 109 e-mail: norm@... mailto:norm@...


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